Culture Engineered Event – Innovative People: DoubleDutch

The Energy of a Team Coming Together

DoubleDutch brings the power of digital to some of the largest live events. Established in 2011 and headquartered in Silicon Valley, they took off on the startup tech rocketship of VC funding and fast growth. As is so often the case, the journey to profitability and category leadership proved to be an intense ride with towering peaks and deep valleys that might have made it hard for some companies to recover. But not DoubleDutch. How do you revolutionize an industry?  The DoubleDutch answer – create a workplace culture of curious, fearless people.  With a 3.9 out of 5-star rating on Glassdoor and a 92% approval rating of CEO and Founder, Lawrence Coburn (who by the way responds to every Glassdoor review, personally), they maintain their position as leaders within their space.

Want to know how they do it?  Join the discussion in Scottsdale, Arizona on April 18th!  We are proud to have DoubleDutch GM and recently promoted Global Director of Employee Engagement, Jackie Roberts share with us the innovative people practices of DoubleDutch.  Get your ticket here!

Feelings in the Workplace – An Insightful Tool or the New “F” Word?

Emotional employee

Crying, yelling, arguing, fighting.  Not ideal in any workplace.  So, when the Huffington Post asked Culture Engineered for tips to include in their article, Crying At Work Happens. Here’s How to Handle It, According To Experts, we stressed the importance of taking a broader approach to such events.  Excessive emotion in the workplace is often and indicator of larger, underlying issues.  Here are some things to consider when emotions erupt in your workplace.

What’s the frequency?

How often are employees overcome with emotion in your workplace?  Weekly?  Daily?  By the hour?  While emotions are a healthy part of the human experience, they are consuming and leave little time or energy for productivity.  Too frequent of outbursts can suggest a culture of enablement or a stressful underlying culture where emotions bubble up.  Such a workplace benefits from training on managing emotions or communication, shifting to proactive interactions and away from reactive.  On the other hand, companies without emotional displays are not necessarily best either.  Life is full of ups and downs.  Given the significant amount of time spent at work, odds are, emotions will sometimes get the best of us at the office.  Letting go in front of someone requires a certain level of vulnerability and trust.  These traits are found within most successful environments.  A workplace without emotion may indicate a lack of trust or an expectation of apathy and therefore may benefit from opportunities to interact outside of work.  Company picnics and office happy hours are a great start, but trust is built by leading with integrity and compassion.  Train and encourage managers to have meaningful conversations with employees over shying away from emotional employees.

Is there a trend?

Where are the breakdowns stemming from?  If a select few are displaying signs of duress repeatedly, its less likely a company-wide culture issue.  Review the surrounding factors of each event, identifying trends.  Are the same people involved with each episode?  Are outbursts more prominent in one department or role?  Unfortunately, we often fail to talk about the string of events leading up to an emotional moment instead, focusing on the straw that broke the camel’s back.  If an employee breaks down because she was warned about coming in late that morning, there is likely more to the story.  Is there a history between the employee and manager?  Has the employee struggled to get to work on time in the past?  Why? These discussions are extremely valuable, helping employees to develop skills needed to succeed as well as uncovering organizational challenges within the company that may be temporarily are prohibiting it from greatness.

Employee behaviors can be signs of potential larger, developing issues within a workplace.  Companies willing to assess their workplace from this perspective can expect to have a more honest, committed, and successful workplace as result.  It’s not always a fun process, but when done right, companies benefit, greatly.

Your company culture – an asset or barrier?  We’re here to help.  Contact a Culture Engineer today by clicking here.

Does Comey’s interview satisfy workplace investigation criteria?

Objective. Genuine. Thorough.  The three keys to a successful workplace investigation.  Granted, consequences of today’s Senate Intelligence Committee Hearing extend beyond those directly involved but also the security of a nation.  But from a business perspective – Comey is a former employee, the government an employer, Trump a top executive, and the Senate Intelligence Committee HR in this serves as the “investigation”.  How do you rate it?

It’s fair to say that no one looks forward to a workplace investigation.  When handled correctly though, a well-done investigation helps to maintain the ethical integrity of an employer and its people, identifies areas where improvement is needed, and ensures everyone plays an active part guarding and creating their workplace culture.  But when tensions are high – as they usually are when an investigation is underway, how are investigations to be handled?  Here are some tips.

Investigate without bias.

Investigations usually fall to the company’s HR professional.  But what happens if you do not have an HR person?  Or, what if your company’s HR person is involved in the investigation?  Should an HR professional be tasked with investigating his/her own boss?  In such cases, look outside the organization for someone to conduct the investigation on the company’s behalf.  An example being Uber’s relatively recent decision to hire former U.S. Attorney General, Eric Holder, to investigate allegations of discrimination and sexual harassment (which has already led to several changes).  Often attorneys and HR consultants can assist in these investigations.  Sign them to a non-disclosure and confidentiality agreement, ensuring findings remain confidential.  While this may not protect a company from legal claims made by employees (active or former), it minimizes risk of an outsider person having loose lips.  Additionally, hiring a person or firm to conduct an investigation suggests the company is making a good faith effort to maintain a fair and ethical culture, which can help should a formal legal matter later surface.

Seek truth, not agendas.

Unfortunately issues prompting an investigation are the result of a culmination of pitfalls.  Often the issue could’ve been addressed or prevented altogether early on by better communication, transparency, accessibility, or even policy.  Investigations can be painful for companies perhaps even more so for good-intended ones.  It is important therefore, to keep in mind that investigations are part of the process in becoming a better company.  Best to uncover an issue sooner versus later as problems often perpetuate over time.  Do not censor investigation results for fear they will expose the company is imperfect.  Be genuine in resolving issues and improving a company’s culture over all else.  A good company can endure valuable criticism.  A good investigator is an honest one.  An investigation that instead seeks to vilify a scapegoat in hopes of allowing a company to save face ultimately serves no one, for long.

It ain’t over, ‘til it’s over.

The only thing worse than a workplace investigation is revisiting a workplace investigation.  Buckle down, complete it, follow-up with all involved, and document it.  While it is rare that post-investigation conversations are full of sunshine and rainbows, even bad news is better than the assumptions typically made accusers, or the accused.  Investigate every aspect possible.  Thorough investigations are often time consuming and yes, unpleasant.  As mentioned previously however, issues prompting an investigation are likely due to a multitude of mishaps, oversights, and miscommunication.   Botched investigations may be viewed as willful or retaliatory.  Do not let your investigation be another symptom of company growing pangs.  It may be the most costly one of all.

Need help with conducting your workplace investigation?  Contact us today.