5 Performance Management Myths Every Leader Should Avoid

The North Wind and the Sun is a famous story that are part of the ancient Greek’s collection, Aesop’s Fables.  It begins with the Sun and North Wind arguing over which is stronger.  To resolve the dispute, they agree to a challenge when they see a man walking along a road, wearing a coat.  Whoever can get the man to remove his coat is the stronger of the two.  The North Wind goes first, blowing and howling more intensely with each gust, frustrated that the man holds his coat only tighter against the wind.  Defeated, it’s then the Sun’s chance.  The Sun begins to shine with gentle beams.  The man unfastens the coat, leaving it to hang loosely from his shoulders.  As the beams grow warmer, the man takes off his coat and sits beneath a tree to enjoy the shade.

The moral of this story is “gentleness and kind persuasion win where force and bluster fail”.  Today, more than 2500 years since written, this story also reflects what we know to be true about human behavior.  Our behavior is largely driven by our experiences and how we feel.  While we may under stable or controlled situations show up a certain way, how we act in stressful or even uncomfortable situations can be very different.  So what does this mean for our workplaces?  How can we lead our teams to success knowing the journey of paving any path is uncomfortable and riddled with stressful obstacles?  Unfortunately much of today’s performance management practices are outdated (if not completely contradictory to what we now know about how we work).  Even the terminology used….driving results….corrective action…..performance review…..the term performance management itself….imply a combative or  suspicious relationship between employee and manager.  Much like the North Wind’s approach toward the man with the cloak, we remain convinced that negative reinforcement and punishment yield desired results…despite our failed attempts.  Here are five of the most common performance management myths that continue to blow through and harm our teams.

Myth #5:  The purpose of Performance Improvement Plans (PIPs) is to set clear expectations for a poor performing employee.

Have you ever struggled to meet the expectations of your job?  Did you need someone to put it in writing to recognize your job was in jeopardy?  From a legal and ethical standpoint, setting expectations is important.  From a commonsense standpoint though – it’s ridiculous.  Using a PIP merely to outline expectations for someone to keep his/her job is similar to describing the water to someone who is drowning, believing it will help him swim.  The primary purpose of a PIP is to create and develop a plan for the employee to improve.  A good PIP will include short-term measurable actions that align to longer-term goals essential indicative of progress.  A great PIP will include manager commitments such as a period of more frequent check-ins to reassess progress.  PIPs are a plan for success, and both the manager and the employee should be collaborating on how to save the situation.  And because the point of the plan is to improve, progress is key.  And similar to horseshoes and hand grenades, close a counts.  An employee who performs better although falls slightly short of the goal, should continue to be supported with the PIP process.  We all learn differently and at different speeds.  Performance management is about the trajectory.  So, an employee’s performance that is trending toward success that over time proves to be sustainable is a positive outcome for any PIP.

Myth #4:  Bonuses drive employees to work harder and smarter.

Bonuses, commissions, and incentives are not new concepts.  Perhaps one of the first positive psychology philosophies adopted by workplaces, pay-for-performance aims to encourage certain desired behaviors and results through positive reinforcement.  Research has shown however that the concept of how pay impacts how we work is much more complex.  Not all pay-for-performance plans produce better employee output.  Success of such a plan depends on the level of complexity in priorities within a role (ie, an incentive for quantity will often compromise quality goals), the level of social dynamics among coworkers, and the level of (existing) motivation within the employee-base to do a good job.  When considering how financial incentives improve employee performance, it’s first important to realize employees fail to succeed in their jobs for only one of two reasons, skill or will.  This is not meant to validate or reinforce the unfortunate misconception that struggling employees are either incompetent or lazy.  If anything, this false belief tends to be held and perpetuated by leaders that are underdeveloped or inexperienced. Neither term meant to reflect an employee’s motivations but instead their experience/expertise (skill) and habits (will).  For example, a sales representative that fails to meet her quota each month is either lacking the experience in converting leads to sales (skill) or has failed to adopt the habits of feeding and maintaining a healthy pipeline (will).  While financial incentives like commissions or bonuses may increase an employee’s short-term motivations, they don’t change an employee’s experience or habits.  In short, pay-for-performance plans can be a great reward for employees making significant contributions to the company’s success.  Pay-for-performance is not however an appropriate or effective way to resolve performance issues.  Research shows leaders meeting with employees more frequently, providing constructive feedback and coaching with those struggling is much more effective in improving performance.  Companies cannot simply buy their way out of it.

Myth #3:  Good employees don’t need performance discussions.

Why do top-performers leave your organization?  Performance discussions, for top-performers, serve as a way to retain them.  Given research shows high performers can deliver 400% more productivity than the average performer, your team’s success could drastically improve if this article dispels your belief in this myth alone.  Only 53% of top performing employees feel their managers provide valuable and timely feedback.  Would your team’s performance be different if your best employees were getting feedback on how they can improve?  How many of them would stay if you used frequent performance discussions with high-performers as a way to detect poor job satisfaction or work-related issues?  Weekly 15-minute check-ins, asking employees two questions, 1) what are their priorities for the week, and 2) how can you (their leader) help them, is one of the simplest and most effective habits a leader can adopt.  Not only will these interactions help retain and develop top performing employees, they will also establish a valuable connections, a quality consistent with the #1 driver of high-performing teams, psychological safety.

 

Myth #2:  Poor employee performance is caused by poor training.

Training is often the first, if not only, offering to an under-performing employee.  But rarely is training the actual answer.  Training is intended to teach skills.  Learning to use new technology or how to create and interpret business financials are skills to be gained by training.  More commonly challenging areas where employees fail to perform revolve around habits.  Staying motivated, time management, effective communication, collaboration, and attendance are the top employee performance issues….and none of them have to do with a lack of skills or need for training.  Similar to why we continue to consume junk food, eat too much, stay up too late, hit the snooze button too many times in the morning, or watch too much TV….it’s not because we lack the knowledge that these behaviors are harmful.  We continue to do things in spite of the negative consequences and even harm they produce.  We are habitual creatures.  It’s not something most of us like to admit.  Research shows habits dictate 40% of what we do each day!  If this is the case, wouldn’t it be fair to assume at least 40% of performance issues are simply bad habits?  What would helping an employee to replace bad habits or build new ones look like?  According to James Clear, author of Atomic Habits, willpower is like a muscle, so the key is to start small, increasing over time.  Staying consistent and not succumbing to feelings of overwhelm or hopelessness helps to create sustainable success.  So, start struggling employees with smaller goals.  If an Inside Sales Representative is not hitting their monthly sales goals, you may realize he is failing to maintain a healthy pipeline.  Start with a number of quality calls he should make each day.  Then look to add in how many appointments he should set each week.  Then how many proposals he should submit….then how many new customers….then how much new revenue.  It’s not as black and white as having him listening to sales training videos, and it may take more patience as his manager, but isn’t that the job of a manager….to develop their people?  If this is not a manager’s #1 priority, perhaps the manager could also benefit from replacing or building new habits.

Myth #1:  Poor performing employees are disengaged or lack motivation to succeed.

Have you lost a loved one and returned to work while still grief-stricken?  Or, have you ever been really sick but decided to work rather than go see a doctor or rest?  How was the quality of your work during these times, honestly?  While working today, if you received a call that your house was broken into, it’s highly unlikely you would be very productive should you try to remain working for the rest of the day, without details   We are not robots.  We are complex beings. The same quality in all of us that drives us to do amazing things like create, collaborate with one another, and innovate, is the same quality that makes us susceptible to the natural setbacks and challenges of life.  While someone may LOVE her job, her team, and her boss…..how she shows up to work is not simply a reflection of how she feels about work.  We are a sum of our experiences – ALL OF THEM.  So, an employee that is stressed or fearful about life outside of work will naturally display symptoms of stress and fear at work.  She may seem tired, suffer from pain or headaches, appear more anxious than normal, struggle to focus, withdrawal socially, and seem more irritable or angry.  All well-documented symptoms of chronic stress, regardless of what is causing that stress.  If she is going through a divorce, or recently lost a loved one, is struggling financially, or with raising children…her poor performance may not be about her feelings toward the job at all.  It is the whole person that shows up to work each day.  It is the whole person that we as leaders are coaching when they’re struggling to perform.  While we as leaders may not be able to solve the problems at home, we can and ought to honor life challenges our employees are dealing with outside of the office.  It starts by connecting with our teams.  While many of today’s leaders have been promoted for our problem-solving capabilities.  This is not the skill that makes someone a good leader.  Good leaders support and collaborate with employees to solve problems.  It’s the difference in giving a man a fish versus teaching him how to fish.  So, the first step to collaborating with an employee on improving his performance is to ask him why he’s struggling.  Pull him aside, share your observations, let him know you’re concerned, ask what’s going on and how you can help.  Start this conversation before you come bearing paperwork.  According to a recent study, 62% of working Americans are lonely, meaning they may not have anyone else to talk to about challenges they are facing.  In many cases, employee life obstacles may first appear as performance issues.  If they don’t have a healthy and supportive network of people around them, you might be the only one to ask them this question.  Because we are social creatures, our work is a reflection of how we are feeling.  Just as a sales or customer service representative may struggle to be patient with or listen to customers when they are not feeling well emotionally or physically, a person that builds websites or analyzes financials is likely to make more mistakes or be less productive when emotionally or physically struggling.  As leaders of teams, it is critical we take a whole-person approach to performance management…..not just for the sake of our teams but for humanity.

Senior leaders say the number one weakness of their organizations’ leaders is their ability to have difficult performance discussions with direct reports.  Unfortunately, it’s our society’s belief in many of these myths that have prevented leaders from learning how to navigate these types of employee-discussions.  The longer we pretend these myths are effective only prolongs the pain felt by our businesses, and those that serve them.  So, who will you be in the story of your team’s success and performance?  Will you be the North Wind, blowing with all your might to make them do what you want….only to fail and be left deflated?  Or will you choose a the way of the Sun?

Intentional Leadership Challenge Kick-Off!

“The more intentional you are about your leadership growth, the greater your potential for becoming the leader you’re capable of being. Never stop learning.” – John C Maxwell

Leaders who intentionally nurture an environment of mutual trust and respect drive stronger employee performance.  A recent study showed the same employees working for an average leader, when led by a highly effective leader, increased productivity by 50%. In this 8-week challenge, you will gain valuable insights to create a framework of effective and sustainable leadership practices with measurable results.

In 8 weeks, leaders learn to inspire teams to ….do great work…. collaborate….. innovate ….and create meaningful results.  Leaders receive:

    • Weekly 1:1 coaching
    • Weekly accountability meeting with other leaders to work through challenges & track progress.
    • TeamEthos insights – real-time actionable insights  to maximize leader’s team performance & develop leadership behaviors in the moment.
    • Weekly team progress report, a unique tool customized for the leader’s team that reveals inefficiencies, opportunities, and how to connect with team members in a way that generates meaningful results.

Registration is limited to ensure participation, so please complete the below form to register today!

$1575 for single participant, $2520 for two.  Register before April 1st and get a 10% discount!

We love teams, so get a 10% discount when you register 2 or more before April 1st!

2020 Leadership Performance Challenge Kick Off!

Virtual leadership call

How would business be different if managers more consistently and effectively, managed employee performance?

Would sales be better?  Customers happier?  Would you sleep better? !

According to a 2019 DDI report, senior leaders say performance discussions with employees as the #1 weakness within their management teams.  And….managers agreed.  Managers are lacking the know-how and confidence to effectively manage and discuss employee performance, and it’s hurting our businesses.  A company’s performance can never improve unless employee performance improves first.

In this interactive series, leaders from varying industries come together virtually weekly for 10 weeks to discuss, practice, and collaborate on performance management techniques.

Upon completion of the challenge, leaders will:

  1. Have completed a performance review for each direct report.
  2. Developed employee and team goals that align with organizational targets.
  3. Demonstrate competency and confidence in difficult employee performance discussions.
  4. Be able to create performance improvement plans for under-performing team members.
  5. Have a check-in schedule with direct employees to ensure potential performance issues are identified and addressed proactively.
  6. Gain a network of peer leaders for continued development & support.

Cost:  $118/week!  Additional discounts for multiple managers from the same company.

Because sessions are interactive, we’d first like to understand more about what you intend to gain, for yourself or your leaders, from this series.

To learn more about the challenge, or to participate, please complete the following:


Better performance starts with better performance discussions…..and now there’s a 10-week path to get you there!

Staying Connected While Working Apart – Effectively deploying & managing remote teams

How are your remote employees working?

Gradually, many of us are coming to the realization that our future consists of a new normal in the face of COVID-19.  What will that look like?  While industries such as healthcare and education will likely transform significantly – how we work as a whole has changed, overnight.  In response to COVID-19, companies scrambled to shift office workers to working from home and for many, there’s no turning back.  But many have realized, working remotely is not all it’s cracked up to be – for remote employees or leaders.  People have been working from home for a few weeks now yet teams are still struggling – even more than they did two weeks ago!  Why?  It’s not a lack of trying, and it’s not a matter of technology.  What separates good teams from underperforming teams is not the distance between them but the connection they have with each other.  This new normal of remote work is a call to us as leaders to foster connection.

Presented by Teresa Marzolph, Culture Engineered

Are You a Good Boss? Two Studies Identify Traits of Top Managers

Worlds Best Boss

Two separate studies were conducted by Google and the Royal Bank of Canada to determine what traits make for a good boss versus average or even bad boss.  Here is what they discovered….

How many great bosses have you had in your career?  For me, two stand out.  One was with a job I hated, the other was with a job I loved.  One was male, the other female.  One was a lot like me, the other not like me at all….except maybe for our sense of humor.  One was stubborn and feared by some in the organization.  The other was the friendliest person you’ve ever met, quick to put others at ease.  So, how is it that I would find these two VERY DIFFERENT people equally great?  Had I changed over time?  There were about ten years between these two bosses after all.  I’ve worked with many great people but what made these two bosses great?  There is no shortage of research on leadership; however two of my favorite studies were performed by Google (2008, then updated in 2018) and Royal Bank of Canada (RBC, 2011-2013) in separate attempts to determine what makes manager good?

What does a good boss look like?

Do you know a good manager when you see one?  Based on the findings of both RBC and Google, not at first glance.  Both studies report good manager traits having little to do with what the manager does, but how and why they do it.  Micro-managing determined highly ineffective by both groups, suggesting a good manager’s day revolves more around strategy and developing or coaching employees; however nearly all other findings relate to how a good manager engages with employees.  Being genuine and showing an interest in both personal and professional well-being for employees rate high on both lists suggesting empathy for others and authenticity are essential in making employees feel valuable.  Today this should be no surprise.  In 2017, Surgeon General Vivek Murthy wrote about the impact loneliness is having on the workplace.  A person with a poor network of friends and family, lacking support needed to push through this epidemic of loneliness in most cases will still need to work, making work perhaps their only opportunity to feel connected.  If true, doesn’t it only make sense employees respond positively to managers that seem invested in the employee’s personal journey?  Look over the list provided here.  How many listed traits do your top managers possess?  More importantly, do you feel your under-performing managers can learn the traits and behaviors necessary to be more effective?  Can a manager learn to be empathetic and genuine?

Google & RBC findings side-by-side
* Trait was either updated or revised in 2018

Why it matters

Google’s parent company, Alphabet, employs more than 107,000 people worldwide.  The company owns more than 88% of search engine market share and is in the race to join the highly exclusive $1 trillion dollar list.  RBC employs 80,000 people, and with 1.28 trillion dollars in assets is the biggest bank in Canada and the 11th biggest bank in the world.  They look for ways to excel, commit to a solution, and go ALL IN.  Google and RBC’s choice to independently research their own management practices that were proving to be effective versus ineffective and build their teams and leaders on these principles is no accident.  This research, although beneficial to many, was not done for humanitarian reasons.  Good managers drive success.  In a study, employees working for a manager identified as average when changed to a manager identified as highly effective, increased productivity by 50%!  Good bosses also have lower employee turnover and themselves also stay with companies longer than bad managers.  It’s important to note, the 2008 Google study was only after Google surveyed their own engineers to determine whether managers were at all necessary within their organization.  It was perhaps this initial project that led them to realize that a good boss is highly valuable whereas a bad boss is actually worse than no boss at all.

I stay in touch with each of my former managers.  I trust that I can call either of them today and they will still take time out of their busy schedules to help me.  I don’t know what their relationships were like with my peers or other leaders within our former organizations although I suspect those relationships were positive.  It was perhaps a year ago that one of them reached out to me in need of a favor.  I stopped everything I was doing and immediately jumped at the chance to help my former boss and friend.  It was no different when I worked for these individuals.  I cared as much about their success as I did my own.  That’s the thing about a great boss – their fingerprints from pushing you forward, catching you when you fall….are EVERYWHERE in your life!  A great boss changes your life,  But because it’s authentic and they genuinely care and love their jobs, it happens so naturally and organically.  Only in hindsight do you look back and wonder….were they working for me or was I working for them?

Managing difficult employees – Can good employees have bad attitudes?

There are two reasons an employee fails to meet reasonable employer expectations – either they can’t or they won’t.  Falling short of expectations is often assessed through the lens of skill or will.  When the employee is trying but lacks the knowledge or experience needed to succeed in his/her role (skill issue), the solution is most commonly solved with training, coaching, better systems or access to resources, or sometimes mentoring.  Managing difficult employees, employees that are not trying however (will issue), is a much bigger challenge.

Behavioral issues are often misdiagnosed as skill/performance issues and therefore often go unresolved.   This is especially unfortunate as these behavioral issues can be incredibly damaging to a company’s culture and success.  Some of the most common workplace behavioral issues are:

  • Excessive absenteeism or tardiness (when not as part of an accommodation)
  • Insubordination
  • Gossip
  • Disruptive to others
  • Poor quality of work
  • Harassing behavior
  • Theft
  • Failure to meet KPIs
  • Emotional outbursts

There are two reasons behavioral issues are more difficult, 1) inexperienced leaders, and 2) employee actor-observer bias.

Experience Matters

Perhaps the hardest lesson learned in managing and leading people is that we all perceive, think about, and value things differently.  It’s easy to say, but when leading a team of conflicting personalities and priorities to achieve a common goal – the leadership can seem overwhelming.  Diagnosing why a person with the desire to succeed isn’t, is a tactical diagnosis.  An employee wants to get more sales, has a great attitude, works hard, and asks for help – it doesn’t take a lot of experience to recognize he needs training.  He’s putting the work in but needs help turning activity into sales.  What about the salesperson that isn’t “working hard”?  She previously hit her quota every month – but her sales have declined steadily over the last few months.  Is she calling out sick all the time?  Is she showing up late?  Leaving early?  When at work – is she working effectively or talking with co-workers and tending more to her social media accounts than customers.  Is she selling to fewer people, closing smaller deals, or both?  She has shown she can do the job, but somewhere along the line stopped.  Why?  This is a harder problem to solve because it requires insight, empathy, and a genuine desire to understand.  Generally, these are leadership qualities developed with experience.  It’s by managing and leading people that you develop the confidence and self-awareness needed to step outside of your own head willing to look at a situation from the perspective of another.  Good people make bad choices all of the time.  Many inexperienced managers assume the person “doesn’t care” or simply “has a bad attitude”.  A leader I worked with in the past would respond to managers complaints about an employee by asking the manager, “was the employee bad when you hired him or did you make him bad?”.  If you want employees to understand the “why” behind your company’s purpose, you need to understand their why as well.  Why do they choose to work hard?  Why do they sometimes choose not to?  You can discipline them, you can warn them, you can suspend them, but nothing serves as a solution to a behavioral problem unless you first understand the why behind it.  Why did they stop caring?  That’s the first step on the path to a solution.  Most employees can regain their love and passion to succeed in their role.  First though – we as leaders NEED to ask what caused it to be lost in the first place.

The actor-observer bias at work

The actor-observer bias is one of several attribution biases, concepts used in social psychology to describe irrational patterns in how we view our own behaviors and interpret behaviors of others.  The term refers to our tendency  to attribute our own behaviors to situational factors while attributing behaviors of others to internal factors.  Put simply, we see our behaviors as a reflection of a situation but perceive others behave a certain way because that’s who they are.  This bias causes behavioral problems to surface in two ways, 1) biased employees see their decisions and behaviors as the only option, rather than a choice, and 2) biased employees subscribe to the idea that only bad people do bad things.  Because someone doesn’t see himself as bad a person, he is incapable of doing bad things and as such, his behaviors are justified.  Think of an employee who is frequently late or absent.  Does she always have a reason?  Does she seem to feel you too should excuse her absence –as though she had no choice but to be late or miss the day?  A person harassing others, although clearly a more serious offense, often does not recognize himself as a harasser.  Because the person doing the harassing believes the person he is harassing either wants or deserves the unwanted attention, he typically feels his behavior is justified.  Ironically, the harasser is often the most offended by harassing behavior demonstrated by others, seeing other harassers as bad people rather than people engaging in harassing behavior (2 Reasons Your Harassment Training is Failing).  Research suggests this bias occurs less often with people we know well – most likely due to exposure.  We see ourselves, behaviors, and decisions as a reflection of situations and the more familiar we are with situations faced by others, the more we recognize that most of us are neither all good nor all bad.  Self-awareness allows us to see ourselves objectively, recognizing the impact our decisions have on others – and that every decision is a choice.  So, next time you’re forced to address an employee’s excessive absences or tardiness, ask him, “do you feel that everyone else that makes it in on time for work has it easy?  Do you feel they do not have extenuating circumstances that they must manage in order to get to work?”  This question can be a game changer in addressing similar behavioral issues.  With more serious behaviors like harassing others or insubordination, it’s important to focus on how the employee’s behavior impacts others – and how the behavior is not in line with the company’s values or culture.  When behavior issues are deliberate such as theft, fraud, or harassing behavior that’s hostile, manipulative, or calculated, it is very unlikely the leopard will change his spots.  There is always a chance that a person engaging in scheming and cunning behavior will change for the better; however, this is a decision she will make on her own.  No punishment, threat, or training will change the behavior and in many situations the person will only use warnings to behave poorly in a more conspicuous way.  It is up to each company and leader to find the right balance of forgiveness and accountability.  People will make mistakes and poor choices – to what extent you, as a leader, are willing to accept the harm those mistakes and poor choices brings to you, your company, and employees, is a choice you must make.

It would be great if we all just got it.  If we all saw our behaviors and decisions as choices and possessed the self-awareness to see how we impact others.  The reality is, we are flawed.  There is no such thing as a perfect person and therefore cannot be a perfect employee, or leader.  A successful workplace culture isn’t about perfection.  A successful culture is about a group of unique individuals coming together to achieve a common purpose.  So the key is establishing a common set of values and then communicating, upholding, and delivering on those values relentlessly – addressing when actions or behaviors deviate from what benefits the group, as a whole, or their collective purpose.  Strong and healthy workplaces have behavioral issues. They only differ from toxic workplaces in how leaders respond to those issues.  Address the behaviors harming your company’s culture today because it’s the only way you will ever achieve your purpose.

Watch our tutorial on how to address employee behavioral issues here.

 

Building an Inclusive Arizona: Sales

CO+HOOTS Foundation Executive Director Lisa Glenn Nobles and Culture Engineered Founder Teresa Marzolph discuss how we can build an inclusive Arizona ecosystem focusing specifically on diversity in the sales cycle. The first in our monthly series on Building an Inclusive Arizona, this conversation will focus on the need for diversity in the Arizona business ecosystem and help companies develop a common language and best practices around inclusive sales cycles.

WORKFORCE EVENT: ROI of Creating a Strong Company Culture

Most professionals agree, having a strong company culture is important.  Like most things in business however, only initiatives that produce results gain support (and investment).  Because strategies to develop, sustain, or improve a company’s culture like any other project requires time and money – the question is inevitable:  what is the ROI of culture?  On March 26th,  AZ Biz Link‘s workforce event hosts a discussion with a panel of experts on the topic of creating a culture that produces valuable results.

Moderator:

  • Kevin Black, Principal & Founder | Edge Challenges

Panelists:

  • James Murphy, President & CEO | Willmeng Construction
  • Julie Eklund, Director Human Resources | Kimley Horn
  • Michele Shuey, Global Director HR Business Partnerships & Employee Engagement | Nextiva
  • Teresa Marzolph, People Strategist & Founder | Culture Engineered
  • Gretchen Mastello, SVP Global People Operations | Axon

Innovative People Event: Upward Projects Culture

People problems taking a toll on your business???😖

In this new monthly series, prominent leaders share their stories of overcoming today’s largest business challenges by making CULTURE a priority. This month we feature the culture of Upward Projects, the Phoenix-based restaurant group behind Postino, Joyride, Windsor, Churn, and Federal Pizza.

A team of primarily part-time employees earning a supplemental income in an industry many consider to be cut-throat and riddled with chaos, Upward Projects has proven culture is not just for high-tech startups and corporate America. A “people-first” company, Upward Projects has expanded to 13 locations in three states since their start in 2001, maintaining a 4.1 out of 5-star rating on Glassdoor (a rating higher than even Zappos, famed for “delivering happiness”).

How do they do it?  On August 23rd, Upward Projects Director of Recruiting, Jason Spencer, and Area Manager & Executive Team, AJ Jolley share the challenges and wins of building a community with a mission to make people feel good.  Join the discussion!  Lunch provided.

Agenda:

12:00pm – Lunch & Discussion
1:00pm – Networking

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER!!!

Culture Engineered Event – Innovative People: DoubleDutch

The Energy of a Team Coming Together

DoubleDutch brings the power of digital to some of the largest live events. Established in 2011 and headquartered in Silicon Valley, they took off on the startup tech rocketship of VC funding and fast growth. As is so often the case, the journey to profitability and category leadership proved to be an intense ride with towering peaks and deep valleys that might have made it hard for some companies to recover. But not DoubleDutch. How do you revolutionize an industry?  The DoubleDutch answer – create a workplace culture of curious, fearless people.  With a 3.9 out of 5-star rating on Glassdoor and a 92% approval rating of CEO and Founder, Lawrence Coburn (who by the way responds to every Glassdoor review, personally), they maintain their position as leaders within their space.

Want to know how they do it?  Join the discussion in Scottsdale, Arizona on April 18th!  We are proud to have DoubleDutch GM and recently promoted Global Director of Employee Engagement, Jackie Roberts share with us the innovative people practices of DoubleDutch.  Get your ticket here!